Friday, December 9, 2011

Thoughts about Christmas by Ravi Zacharias

Ravi Zacharias is one of my favorite speakers and authors.  I copied these thoughts from his website www.rzim.org.

The primary purpose of a home is to reflect and to distribute the love of Christ. Anything that usurps that is idolatrous. Having been lifted beyond the prejudice of culture, Jesus repositioned the place of wealth for his disciples. So staggering was the impact that many of them in the years to come would leave their own homes to go to distant parts of the world in order to proclaim the heaven-sent message that redefined their earthly homes. Eleven of them paid for that message with their lives.    

The first time I walked through the noisy streets of Bethlehem and endured its smells, I gained a whole new sense of the difference between our Christmas carols, glamorizing the sweetness of the "little town of Bethlehem," and the harsh reality of God becoming flesh and dwelling among us. Ah! But is it not part of the wonder of God's disclosure of reality that He points to what we live with to show us what true living is meant to be? 

Jesus brought truth to light and a different world to his message. In him our hearts find their true home. G.K. Chesterton captures the wonder of such a thought.

A child in a foul stable,
Where the beasts feed and foam;
Only where He was homeless
Are you and I at home:
We have hands that fashion and heads that know,
But our hearts we lost—how long ago!
In a place no chart nor ship can show
Under the sky's dome.

To an open house in the evening
Home shall men come,
To an older place than Eden
And a taller town than Rome.
To the end of the way of the wandering star,
To the things that cannot be and that are,
To the place where God was homeless
And all men are at home.(1)

Jesus's earthly address changes our own. Come to Christ this Epiphany, and see what it means to live.

Ravi Zacharias is founder and chairman of the board of Ravi Zacharias International Ministries.
(1) G.K. Chesterton, "The House of Christmas," from Robert Knille, ed., As I Was Saying (Grand Rapids, MI: William B. Eerdmans, 1985), 304-5.